Long Research Paper Topics

Long Research Paper Topics-21
Schwab's paper details the raft of physiological traits that woodpeckers have developed to avoid brain damage and bleeding or detached eyes when hammering their beaks into trees at up to 20 times a second, 12,000 times a day. poet and author Phyllis Mc Ginley at least, is what "makes nations great and marriages happy." It's also the backbone of the booty call, if research published in 2009 is anything to go by.In addition to a very broad but surprisingly squishy skull and sturdy jaw muscles, the woodpecker has a "relatively small" brain – which probably explains a lot. Appearing in , "The ‘booty call': a compromise between men's and women's ideal mating strategies," was written by researchers from the department of psychology at New Mexico State University.

Schwab's paper details the raft of physiological traits that woodpeckers have developed to avoid brain damage and bleeding or detached eyes when hammering their beaks into trees at up to 20 times a second, 12,000 times a day. poet and author Phyllis Mc Ginley at least, is what "makes nations great and marriages happy." It's also the backbone of the booty call, if research published in 2009 is anything to go by.In addition to a very broad but surprisingly squishy skull and sturdy jaw muscles, the woodpecker has a "relatively small" brain – which probably explains a lot. Appearing in , "The ‘booty call': a compromise between men's and women's ideal mating strategies," was written by researchers from the department of psychology at New Mexico State University.

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These important questions were answered in 2009 by a team of researchers from the University of Bern with their seminal paper, "Are full or empty beer bottles sturdier and does their fracture-threshold suffice to break the human skull? Stephan Bolliger and his colleagues tested the breaking energy of full and empty beer bottles using a drop tower. The titles of scientific research papers can sometimes be fairly impenetrable to the layman; other times they may take a more direct approach.

Moreover, they discovered that a "full bottle will strike a target with almost 70 percent more energy than an empty bottle," but that either is capable of breaking a human skull. Published in 2003, "Pressures produced when penguins pooh – calculations on avian defecation" certainly belongs to the latter category.

"Optimizing the sensory characteristics and acceptance of canned cat food: use of a human taste panel" describes the bizarre methodology for human tasters to "profile the flavour and texture of a range of cat food products" – including evaluating "meat chunk and gravy/gel constituents." The impact of this on the number of job applications to the beer- and chocolate-tasting industries remains to be seen.

While "cat food taster" is unlikely to appear on anybody's dream job list, at least that profession is unencumbered by the daily risk of serious injury.

Crucially, the research also showed that these mosquitoes can be attracted to Limburger cheese, a stinky fromage that shares many characteristics with the whiff of human feet, offering potential use as a synthetic bait for traps.

Interestingly, Knols is one of the few people to have won an Ig Nobel (for entomology in 2006) and a Nobel Peace Prize (shared in 2005 as part of the International Atomic Energy Agency). To examine this, researchers from the department of psychology at Illinois State University enlisted the help of 23 blindfolded volunteers, recording their perceptions of the weight of either a pound of lead or a pound of feathers contained within boxes of precisely the same shape and size.

The suggestion is that factors such as the "muscular forces" required to handle an object could also play a role in perceptions of weight.

Despite their notorious penchant for fully, or sometimes partially, dead rodents in their mouths, cats are surprisingly fussy eaters.

However, Professor Schwitzgebel believes this is a good thing, as "the demand that ethicists live as moral models would create distortive pressures on the field." published "Impact of wet underwear on thermoregulatory responses and thermal comfort in the cold." The authors were Martha Kold Bakkevig of SINTEF Unimed in Trondheim, Norway and Ruth Nielson at Kongens Lyngby's Technical University of Denmark.

Bakkevig and Nielson had investigated "the significance of wet underwear" by monitoring the skin and intestinal warmth, as well as weight loss, of eight adult male subjects wearing wet or dry underwear in controlled cold conditions.

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